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Meet Ariel, SLI scholar

Ariel (Huguenot High School ’20) is pursuing degrees in political science and history at Eastern Mennonite University.

Interview transcript:

I was surprised by how difficult sometimes it is to get into college, because it feels that once you’re there, it becomes certainly easier because you have a community and there are resources and people who pretty much are in charge of making you feel welcome and working for you, towards your success. So yeah, I was surprised by the huge contrast between how hard is to get into college, all the barriers that exist, all the bureaucracy, and especially when you’re first generation, it’s even harder because you have no idea how to go. Once you’re [in college] it’s more accessible than getting into it, actually.

In Richmond I remember my freshman, sophomore, and even junior year, I was pretty skeptical if going to college was going to be a reality for me, but once I saw Angela, Gabriela, and Katherine actually getting into college and doing well in their first year, I was like, “Okay, so it’s possible.”

I guess some advice for all the people who are students right now in SLI is that sometimes it’s crazy, the amount of work you have to do, especially if you’re working with Peter. You have to do a lot of papers, you have to read a lot, but at the end is worth it, definitely. It not only helps you with your work in high school because you definitely get an advantage, you get ahead of your peers in high school, but you definitely get another advantage once you get to college. Either in your critical skills or your writing skills or written skills, you’ll definitely see the results.

A year after I arrived [in the United States] I started in SLI, in high school. Reflecting to that, it’s been great, it’s been a lot.

SLI was a great experience for me. I felt that it prepared me pretty well for my college experience in every aspect. I was able to improve my English skill set. I mean, when I came here I barely knew English, so that was one thing. I was also inspired by all my mentors and developed my curiosity and critical thinking skills, too, so that was pretty good, too.

When I came here and I took my first writing class in college, I realized, Wow, yeah – I could tell, like seeing my other peers, that I was pretty much ahead of them because of SLI, and because of the work I did before coming here. That was definitely something I was really like happy about it. So yeah, SLI was definitely great for me.

When I got here [to college] I was shy, definitely, and more timid. I became more confident in my skills and in myself as a person. I learned more about the Latino culture here in the U.S. I got to know and become friends of a bunch of new Hispanic people and at this point they’re like my brothers and sisters and family, pretty much, because of the same situations we face and like sharing the great things about our culture, like our food and music.

I feel I’ve become more understanding, humane, and empathetic toward my community and toward all the other BIPOC communities, immigrant communities as a whole, so I think that’s something that my experience in college taught me and I learned through here, to be more humane, more empathetic, and definitely proactive towards these communities, towards the issues that we face in this society.

That was the first thing I did when I got [to college] was be involved with [the Latino Student Alliance]. I eventually became their co-president. That was a fun experience and now, towards my senior year, I became more involved with [Student Government Association], like a bigger picture club.

I’ve been involved with a bunch of clubs and orgs here on campus. It’s been definitely a learning experience for me, getting to know and interact with all these different people and get to know them better and form new friendships.

My main major was political science, and then I took a couple history classes and I realized, Oh wow, political science and history work pretty well together, and I ended up adding the history major, too.

I had a chance to take a couple Spanish courses with a focus on Latin American politics, and about like social movements and dictatorships in Latin America and it was great definitely, a good experience.

Playing soccer here at EMU was fun, to play four years, to connect with new people. I pretty much learned a lot about leadership and put into practice some skills, too, that was great, too. Overall it was a pretty good season for us. We did a bunch of good stuff this year, so that was good.

[Approaching graduation] is kind of bittersweet. It’s exciting definitely because it’s a transition time and actually I am excited to see and put into actual practice all the skills that I’ve learned here, all the theory and academic work, and actually interact with people from my community, so that’s pretty exciting, too, but at the same time kind of sad, definitely, since I think EMU was definitely a great fit for me. I’m going to be leaving a couple friendships here.

Now I’m thinking about what I’m going to do. I’m definitely applying to a couple grad school programs. I’m not sure if I’m going to go right into it after undergrad. I might work for a year or a couple months and get a sense of the work. We’ll see from there.

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